An Educator's Guide to Information Literacy: What Every High by Ann Marlow Riedling Ph.D.

By Ann Marlow Riedling Ph.D.

Serving as a text/resource ebook for academics of highschool scholars, this identify presents functional assist in getting ready scholars to be lively lifelong novices and effective seekers and clients of data. It offers a comparability of the AASL details Literacy criteria for scholar studying to the ACRL info literacy criteria, together with particular classes to educate those criteria; payment lists to ensure scholars be aware of, comprehend, and will display their use; and formative and summative evaluation principles to guarantee that the scholars are info literacy prepared for college.

Serving as a text/resource ebook for lecturers of highschool scholars, this identify presents sensible assist in getting ready scholars to be energetic lifelong beginners and effective seekers and clients of knowledge. It offers a comparability of the AASL info Literacy criteria for scholar studying to the ACRL details literacy criteria, together with particular classes to educate those criteria; checklists to ensure scholars recognize, comprehend, and will show their use; and formative and summative evaluation rules to guarantee that the scholars are details literacy prepared for school. This publication will supply aid and advice to highschool academics and librarians involved that top university seniors are usually not able to take on the varsity library and faculty point examine assignments. and it'll tell scholars approximately what they should be aware of. Grades 9-12.

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5. From An Educator’s Guide to Information Literacy: What Every High School Senior Needs to Know. Westport, CT: Libraries Unlimited, 2007. Copyright © 2007 by Ann Marlow Riedling. 8: Primary and Secondary Sources NAME: _________________________________________ DATE: _____________________ What is the difference between primary and secondary resources and why is it important? Primary sources (also called original research articles) allow the researcher to get as close as possible to what actually happened during a time period or an historical event.

Does it include materials and methods for conducting the research? Does it give every detail of the results? Does it provide complete references? Examples of primary sources include memoirs, letters, interviews, autobiographies, manuscript collections, speeches, photographs, audio and video recordings, and public opinion polls. Some characteristics/examples of secondary sources are: • They quote researchers from oral interviews • Usually do not cite complete reference information Examples of secondary sources are books, popular magazines, and letters to the editor.

Cite What You Find Using a Standard Format: Give credit where credit is due—cite your sources. Citing your sources serves two purposes, it gives proper credit to the creators of the materials used, and it allows those who read your work to duplicate your research and locate the sources you listed as references (additional information regarding citing sources can be found later in this chapter). For this lesson, use all seven steps of this research process to locate appropriate information for your research.

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