A Practical Guide to Information Literacy Assessment for by Carolyn Radcliff, Mary L. Jensen, Joseph A. Salem Jr.,

By Carolyn Radcliff, Mary L. Jensen, Joseph A. Salem Jr., Kenneth J. Burhanna, Julie A. Gedeon

Details literacy review applies to a few contexts within the greater schooling enviornment: institutional curricula, info literacy courses, info literacy classes, course-integrated details literacy guideline, and stand-alone details literacy workshops and on-line tutorials. This sensible consultant presents an summary of the review method: making plans; choice and improvement of instruments; and research and reporting of knowledge. An assessment-decision chart is helping readers fit applicable evaluate instruments and methods with studying results and educational settings. review instruments, prepared through sort, are observed by way of case stories. numerous info literacy criteria are referenced, with emphasis given to ACRL's info Literacy Competency criteria for greater schooling.

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A Practical Guide to Information Literacy Assessment for Academic Librarians

Info literacy evaluation applies to a few contexts within the larger schooling enviornment: institutional curricula, info literacy courses, info literacy classes, course-integrated info literacy guide, and stand-alone details literacy workshops and on-line tutorials.

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2003). Classroom assessment: A practical guide for educators. Los Angeles, CA: Pyrczak Publishing. Oosterhof, A. (2001). Classroom applications of educational measurement. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill. Rinvolucri, M. (2003). How I pay attention in class. Essential Teacher, 1(1), 51–53. Taylor, G. R. (2003). Informal classroom assessment strategies for teachers. Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Press. 5 Classroom Assessment Techniques Indicators: Requires little time Requires little money Level of assessment: Classroom Domain: Affective, Cognitive Easy access to participants Little or no need for faculty collaboration No outside expertise needed Key Characteristics: • • • • • • Used in classroom settings or as follow-up to instruction session.

37 38 THE TOOLS Inform the students that they have two or three minutes to respond to the question. If it is important to you that students write in complete sentences, make that expectation clear at the beginning, though generally you will want students to focus on the content, not the grammar or format. Stick to the time period. The idea is for students to give you their immediate impressions and not try to second guess what you want. Remember also that if you are doing the assessment at the end of the class, students will be anxious to finish the task and leave the classroom.

From lower to higher, they are: • Remember: Retrieve relevant knowledge from long-term memory. • Understand: Construct meaning from instructional messages, including oral, written, and graphic communication. • Apply: Carry out or use a procedure in a given situation. • Analyze: Break material into its constituent parts and determine how the parts relate to one another and to an overall structure or purpose. • Evaluate: Make judgments based on criteria and standards. • Create: Put elements together to form a coherent or functional whole; reorganize elements into a new pattern or structure (Anderson and Krathwohl, 2001, pp.

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